iPhoning it in and a Quicksilver tip

Seeing how it’s all about the quick fixes these days (with the bulk of my time taken up with more pleasant pursuits), I wanted to take a minute to spew out some random nerd potpourri.

To iPhone, or not to iPhone

iPhoneI got a chance this afternoon to finally play around a bit with an iPhone, and from the brief time that I had to play with it I was very impressed. I think one thing that was really striking is how familiar the whole interface felt even though the only exposure I’ve had to its UI was via online video and some photos. Within seconds of getting my greasy, greedy fingers on it I was happily pinching and flipping and scrolling around like there was no tomorrow.

Seeing how no one has (yet) unlocked the iPhone to work on any non-AT&T GSM networks, I have to try and determine if it’s a worthwhile risk to buy one and use it solely as a WiFi-enabled iPod. One big plus is Toronto Hydro’s OneZone, which has adequate enough coverage that it could work fairly well as a replacement for Roger’s stupidly expensive EDGE network. It’s only $29 a month for unlimited access, too, so it’s not an expensive option.

The one concern I have with buying one now is the possibility that Apple may not be able to prod Rogers (Canada’s sole GSM provider) to loosen their grip on their bandwidth charges, Right now with Rogers for $5 a month extra you get a measly 5mbs of data transfer. The double kick in the balls is:

  1. This is only WAP data - HTML pages are charged at 0.05 per kilobyte. This means that downloading the HTML version of the Globe and Mail’s front page (weighing in at 1.14mbs total) would cost me 58 dollars if my math is correct.
  2. This is only a limited list of “mobile internet partners” — any WAP site not on this list is charged at the 0.05 per kb rate.

With AT&T offering unlimited data for all of their plans, Rogers’ price gouging is just fucking ridiculous.

So my concern is that Apple may end up giving Rogers a big middle finger and go with one of the CDMA providers (Bell Mobility, Telus, etc.) instead. Yes, there isn’t a CDMA iPhone yet, but I’m sure it’s only a matter of time. This would leave any early Canadian adopters who purchased one of the GSM iPhones hoping for an eventual Rogers / Apple deal cellular-less and sad-faced.

Sure, this is all conjecture at this point. Who knows, maybe Rogers might actually capitulate to Apple and completely revamp their data pricing. If I do end up buying an iPhone now I will definitely have to hope so, less I end up with a very expensive WiFi iPod with a useless phone feature.

Quicksilver tip: Assign quick keys based on the current application

QuicksilverI love the fact that I’ve been using Quicksilver nearly since it was first released and I still keep finding new stuff it can do. Here’s a tip I found recently: you can assign quick keys in Quicksilver on a per-application basis.

I recently implemented John Gruber’s killer non-top posting applescripts for Apple Mail and also followed his advice to use FastScripts to override Mail’s default menu keys and run these scripts instead.

I just realized you can do this from within Quicksilver, alleviating the need for FastScripts. The secret is when you are creating a new quick key action in Quicksilver to switch to the Scope tab in the quick key settings:


Here you can constrain the quick key to a specific application, to any application but the one you specific, or allow it to work in all applications. You can get to the Scope tab by clicking on the (i) button at the bottom right-hand corner of the Quicksilver quick key prefpane.

Hey, maybe it’s obvious, but it’s the first time I noticed it, so hopefully this is news to you, too. Anyone else have Quicksilver tips they want to share?

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